Email updates

Keep up to date with the latest news and content from BMC Medical Education and BioMed Central.

Open Access Highly Accessed Research article

Use of online clinical videos for clinical skills training for medical students: benefits and challenges

Hye Won Jang1 and Kyong-Jee Kim2*

Author Affiliations

1 Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 300 Cheoncheon-dong, Jangan-gu, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 440-746, South Korea

2 Department of Medical Education, Dongguk University School of Medicine, 32 Dongguk-ro, Ilsandong-gu, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do 410-820, South Korea

For all author emails, please log on.

BMC Medical Education 2014, 14:56  doi:10.1186/1472-6920-14-56

Published: 21 March 2014

Abstract

Background

Multimedia learning has been shown effective in clinical skills training. Yet, use of technology presents both opportunities and challenges to learners. The present study investigated student use and perceptions of online clinical videos for learning clinical skills and in preparing for OSCE (Objective Structured Clinical Examination). This study aims to inform us how to make more effective us of these resources.

Methods

A mixed-methods study was conducted for this study. A 30-items questionnaire was administered to investigate student use and perceptions of OSCE videos. Year 3 and 4 students from 34 Korean medical schools who had access to OSCE videos participated in the online survey. Additionally, a semi-structured interview of a group of Year 3 medical students was conducted for an in-depth understanding of student experience with OSCE videos.

Results

411 students from 31 medical schools returned the questionnaires; a majority of them found OSCE videos effective for their learning of clinical skills and in preparing for OSCE. The number of OSCE videos that the students viewed was moderately associated with their self-efficacy and preparedness for OSCE (pā€‰<ā€‰0.05). One-thirds of those surveyed accessed the video clips using mobile devices; they agreed more with the statement that it was convenient to access the video clips than their peers who accessed the videos using computers (pā€‰<ā€‰0.05). Still, students reported lack of integration into the curriculum and lack of interaction as barriers to more effective use of OSCE videos.

Conclusions

The present study confirms the overall positive impact of OSCE videos on student learning of clinical skills. Having faculty integrate these learning resources into their teaching, integrating interactive tools into this e-learning environment to foster interactions, and using mobile devices for convenient access are recommended to help students make more effective use of these resources.