Email updates

Keep up to date with the latest news and content from BMC Structural Biology and BioMed Central.

Open Access Research article

Type II restriction endonuclease R.Eco29kI is a member of the GIY-YIG nuclease superfamily

Elena M Ibryashkina1, Marina V Zakharova1, Vladimir B Baskunov2, Ekaterina S Bogdanova1, Maxim O Nagornykh1, Marat M Den'mukhamedov1, Bogdan S Melnik3, Andrzej Kolinski4, Dominik Gront4, Marcin Feder5, Alexander S Solonin1 and Janusz M Bujnicki5*

Author Affiliations

1 Institute of Biochemistry and Physiology of Microorganisms, Russian Academy of Sciences, Pushchino, 142290, Russia

2 Chemistry Department, Moscow State University, Moscow, 119992, Russia

3 Institute of Protein Research, Russian Academy of Sciences, Pushchino, 142290, Russia

4 Faculty of Chemistry, Warsaw University, Pasteura 1, PL-02-093 Warsaw, Poland

5 Laboratory of Bioinformatics and Protein Engineering, International Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology in Warsaw, Trojdena 4, PL-02-109 Warsaw, Poland

For all author emails, please log on.

BMC Structural Biology 2007, 7:48  doi:10.1186/1472-6807-7-48

Published: 12 July 2007

Abstract

Background

The majority of experimentally determined crystal structures of Type II restriction endonucleases (REases) exhibit a common PD-(D/E)XK fold. Crystal structures have been also determined for single representatives of two other folds: PLD (R.BfiI) and half-pipe (R.PabI), and bioinformatics analyses supported by mutagenesis suggested that some REases belong to the HNH fold. Our previous bioinformatic analysis suggested that REase R.Eco29kI shares sequence similarities with one more unrelated nuclease superfamily, GIY-YIG, however so far no experimental data were available to support this prediction. The determination of a crystal structure of the GIY-YIG domain of homing endonuclease I-TevI provided a template for modeling of R.Eco29kI and prompted us to validate the model experimentally.

Results

Using protein fold-recognition methods we generated a new alignment between R.Eco29kI and I-TevI, which suggested a reassignment of one of the putative catalytic residues. A theoretical model of R.Eco29kI was constructed to illustrate its predicted three-dimensional fold and organization of the active site, comprising amino acid residues Y49, Y76, R104, H108, E142, and N154. A series of mutants was constructed to generate amino acid substitutions of selected residues (Y49A, R104A, H108F, E142A and N154L) and the mutant proteins were examined for their ability to bind the DNA containing the Eco29kI site 5'-CCGCGG-3' and to catalyze the cleavage reaction. Experimental data reveal that residues Y49, R104, E142, H108, and N154 are important for the nuclease activity of R.Eco29kI, while H108 and N154 are also important for specific DNA binding by this enzyme.

Conclusion

Substitutions of residues Y49, R104, H108, E142 and N154 predicted by the model to be a part of the active site lead to mutant proteins with strong defects in the REase activity. These results are in very good agreement with the structural model presented in this work and with our prediction that R.Eco29kI belongs to the GIY-YIG superfamily of nucleases. Our study provides the first experimental evidence for a Type IIP REase that does not belong to the PD-(D/E)XK or HNH superfamilies of nucleases, and is instead a member of the unrelated GIY-YIG superfamily.