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Open Access Research article

High molecular mass proteomics analyses of left ventricle from rats subjected to differential swimming training

Luiz A O Rocha15, Bernardo A Petriz1, David H Borges1, Ricardo J Oliveira2, Rosangela V de Andrade1, Gilberto B Domont4, Rinaldo W Pereira12 and Octávio L Franco135*

Author Affiliations

1 Centro de Análises Proteômicas e Bioquímicas, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Genômicas e Biotecnologia, Universidade Católica de Brasília, Brasília-DF, Brazil

2 Programa de Pós-Graduação em Educação Física, da Universidade de Brasília

3 Departamento de Biologia, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, Juiz de Fora-MG, Brazil

4 Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Protemics Unit, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

5 Pos-graduação em patologia molecular, Universidade de Brasilia, Brasilia, DF, Brazil

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BMC Physiology 2012, 12:11  doi:10.1186/1472-6793-12-11

Published: 5 September 2012

Abstract

Background

Regular exercises are commonly described as an important factor in health improvement, being directly related to contractile force development in cardiac cells.

In order to evaluate the links between swimming exercise intensity and cardiac adaptation by using high molecular mass proteomics, isogenic Wistar rats were divided into four groups: one control (CG) and three training groups (TG’s), with low, moderate and high intensity of exercises.

In order to evaluate the links between swimming exercise intensity and cardiac adaptation by using high molecular mass proteomics, isogenic Wistar rats were divided into four groups: one control (CG) and three training groups (TG’s), with low, moderate and high intensity of exercises.

Results

Findings here reported demonstrated clear morphologic alterations, significant cellular injury and increased energy supplies at high exercise intensities. α-MyHC, as well proteins associated with mitochondrial oxidative metabolism were shown to be improved. α-MyHC expression increase 1.2 fold in high intensity training group when compared with control group. α-MyHC was also evaluated by real-time PCR showing a clear expression correlation with protein synthesis data increase in 8.48 fold in high intensity training group. Other myofibrillar protein, troponin , appear only in high intensity group, corroborating the cellular injury data. High molecular masses proteins such as MRS2 and NADH dehydrogenase, involved in metabolic pathways also demonstrate increase expression, respectily 1.5 and 1.3 fold, in response to high intensity exercise.

Conclusions

High intensity exercise demonstrated an increase expression in some high molecular masses myofibrilar proteins, α-MyHC and troponin. Furthermore this intensity also lead a significant increase of other high molecular masses proteins such as MRS2 and NADH dehydrogenase in comparison to low and moderate intensities. However, high intensity exercise also represented a significant degree of cellular injury, when compared with the individuals submitted to low and moderate intensities.

Keywords:
Heart tissue; High molecular mass proteomic; Muscle; Myofibrillar proteins; Swimming training