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Open Access Highly Accessed Research article

Effects of exercise on depressive symptoms in adults with arthritis and other rheumatic disease: a systematic review of meta-analyses

George A Kelley* and Kristi S Kelley

Author Affiliations

Department of Biostatistics, Robert C. Byrd Health Sciences Center, West Virginia University, PO Box 9190, 26506-9190 Morgantown, WV, USA

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BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders 2014, 15:121  doi:10.1186/1471-2474-15-121

Published: 7 April 2014

Abstract

Background

Depression is a major public health problem among adults with arthritis and other rheumatic disease. The purpose of this study was to conduct a systematic review of previous meta-analyses addressing the effects of exercise (aerobic, strength or both) on depressive symptoms in adults with osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, fibromyalgia and systemic lupus erythematous.

Methods

Previous meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials were included by searching nine electronic databases and cross-referencing. Methodological quality was assessed using the Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews (AMSTAR) Instrument. Random-effects models that included the standardized mean difference (SMD) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were reported. The alpha value for statistical significance was set at p ≤ 0.05. The U3 index, number needed to treat (NNT) and number of US people who could benefit were also calculated.

Results

Of the 95 citations initially identified, two aggregate data meta-analyses representing 6 and 19 effect sizes in as many as 870 fibromyalgia participants were included. Methodological quality was 91% and 82%, respectively. Exercise minus control group reductions in depressive symptoms were found for both meta-analyses (SMD, -0.61, 95% CI, -0.99 to -0.23, p = 0.002; SMD, -0.32, 95% CI, -0.53 to -0.12, p = 0.002). Percentile improvements (U3) were equivalent to 22.9 and 12.6. The number needed to treat was 6 and 9 with an estimated 0.83 and 0.56 million US people with fibromyalgia potentially benefitting.

Conclusions

Exercise improves depressive symptoms in adults with fibromyalgia. However, a need exists for additional meta-analytic work on this topic.