Table 2

List of excluded primary studies and secondary reviews.

Article details:

Ref.

Reason(s) for exclusion.


Brieger WR et al.: West African Youth Initiative: outcome of a reproductive health education program. J Adolescent Health 2001, 29: 436–446.

[14]

Repeated cross-sectional design felt to limit our objectivity in measuring programme attrition.

Gallant M, Maticka-Tyndale E: School-based HIV prevention programmes for African youth. Soc Sci Med 2004, 58:1337–1351.

[11]

Secondary review, including studies without control group.

Kinsman J et al.: Implementation of a comprehensive AIDS education programme for schools in Masaka District, Uganda, AIDS Care1999, 11: 591–601.

[35]

No control group

Kinsman J et al.: Evaluation of a comprehensive school-based aids education programme in rural Masaka, Uganda, Health Education Res 2001, 16: 85–100.

[36]

No control group

Maclachlan M et al.: AIDS education for youth through active learning: A school-based approach from Malawi, Int J Educ Dev 1997, 17: 41–50.

[37]

Matched control used. Did not fulfil the criteria of having both pre- and post-intervention assessment.

Magnani R et al.: The impact of life skills education on adolescent sexual risk behaviors in KwaZulu-natal, South Africa, J Adolescent Health, 2005, 36: 289–304.

[38]

No control group

Magnussen L et al.: Interventions to prevent HIV/AIDS among adolescents in less developed countries: are they effective? Int J Adolescent Med Health, 2004, 16: 303–323.

[12]

Secondary review, not as focused geographically and in terms of types of intervention.

Mbizvo MT et al.: Effects of a randomized health education intervention on aspects of reproductive health knowledge and reported behaviour among adolescents in Zimbabwe, Soc Sci Med 1997, 44: 573–577.

[39]

Outcomes relating to pregnancy and contraception, and excluding STD/HIV/AIDS.

Okonofua FE et al.: Impact of an intervention to improve treatment-seeking behavior and prevent sexually transmitted diseases among Nigerian youths, Int J Infect Dis, 2003, 7: 61–73.

[22]

Repeated cross-sectional design felt to limit our objectivity in measuring programme attrition.

Shuey DA et al.: Increased sexual abstinence among in-school adolescents as a result of school health education in Soroti district, Uganda, Health Educ Res, 1999, 14: 411–419.

[17]

Repeated cross-sectional design felt to limit our objectivity in measuring programme attrition.

Speizer IS et al.: The effectiveness of adolescent reproductive health interventions in developing countries: A review of the evidence, J Adolescent Health, 2003, 33: 324–348.

[13]

Secondary review, not as focused, geographically/intervention types. Includes studies without control group.


Paul-Ebhohimhen et al. BMC Public Health 2008 8:4   doi:10.1186/1471-2458-8-4

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