Table 4

Associations between HCWs’ attitudes and their intentions to vaccinate in cross-sectional studies
Authors Setting Study population/response rate Determinant (attitude) Intention to vaccinate Measure of association Adjustments
Gonik et al. (2000) [19] USA 313/43% Obstetrician-gynecologists Assess routinely the patients for vaccine- preventable diseases Reported habit to administer vaccines Spearman rho correlation 0.30–0.70; p < 0.05 None
Zimmerman et al. (2002) [22] USA 281/72,4% general practitioners, family practice, pediatricians Agreement with the national recommendations on varicella vaccination. Yes vs no Would recommend the vaccination In children 12–18 months: 98% 1A,1C, 1D,3E, 1F
vs 3%, p < 0.05
Children 4–6 years: 93%
vs 19%, p < 0.05
Children 11–12 years:
86% vs 68%, p < 0.05
Taylor et al. (2002) [21] USA 112/? pediatricians A) Number of injections willing to give in one visit. Range 1 to 6 (>5) Increase of record linked vaccine coverage A) Per each injection more: Increase at 8 months of 3.6% (95% CI 0.4-6.8) p > 0.05, at 19 months 1.5% (95% CI −2.8 - 5.5) p > 0.05 2B, 1C, 3E
B) Recommendation of inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) vs oral vaccine B) Using IPV: Increase at 8 months of 8.9% (95% CI 3.3-15.4) p < 0.05, at 19 months 15.4% (95% CI 7.7 - 23.1) p < 0.05
Schupfner et al. (2002) [20] Germany 97/73% pediatricians Prefer to give combined vaccines than separate Reported vaccine coverage rate 100% in those with high reported coverage (>80%) vs 81% in low coverage (<80%) p > 0.05 2C,4D,4E
Milledge et al. (2003) [24] Australia 160/67% general practitioners Concerns about varicella vaccine: A) Immunity may not be life-long Would recommend universal varicella vaccination A) OR 0.60 (95%CI 0.33-1.21) p > 0.05 1B, 1C, 7E, 2F
B) Increase in herpes zoster B) OR 1.08 (0.33-3.6) p > 0.05
C) More serious varicella disease in adults C) OR 0.92 (0.37-2.27) p > 0.05
D) Possible, unknown side effects D) OR: 0.31 (0.15–0.63) p > 0.05
Davis et al. (2003) [23] USA 694/60% family physicians A) Considers giving 5 injections at 1 visit vs less Reported habit of recommending the vaccine A) OR 17.29 (95% CI 6.35, 47.05) p < 0.05 4E, 1F
B) Considers giving 4 injections at 1 visit vs less B) OR 8.69(95% CI 4.21, 17.94) p < 0.05
Jungbauer-Gans et al. (2003) [25] Germany 136/71% family physicians and pediatricians Importance of the officially recommended vaccinations (Index: 1 = not at all, 5 = very) Reported habit of recommending full vaccination Index of 4.8 in those recommending full vaccination vs 3.9 in those who did not. p < 0.05 None
94/71% family physicians and pediatricians Importance of the officially recommended vaccinations (same Index) Record linked vaccine coverage One point increase in the Index was associated with an increase of 25.8% in the coverage. p < 0.05 None
Wilson et al. (2004) [26] Canada 312/59,4% naturopathic students Trust in Public Health information Willingness to advise full vaccination OR 3.72 (95% CI 1.42–10.7) p < 0.05 1D, 5E
Clark et al. (2006) [29] USA 183/54% obstetricians Perceive to have a role in promote Tdap vaccination to other adults (not mothers) in contact with infants Report to recommend Tdap vaccine to pregnant women 77% perceive having a role in those recommending vaccine to pregnant women vs 50% in those who do not. p < 0.05 None
Davis et al. (2007) [30] USA 336/49% family physicians, general internists Agree that pertoussis is serious enough to warrant using Tdap in adults. Yes vs no or neutral Would recommend the vaccination if recommended 93% vs 68%. p < 0.05 None
Gust et al. (2008) [31] USA 733/65% family physicians, pediatricians Have some concerns about immunization Recommend full immunization OR 0.32 (95% CI 0.56-0.19) p < 0.05 1C, 1D, 1E

Herzog et al.

Herzog et al. BMC Public Health 2013 13:154   doi:10.1186/1471-2458-13-154

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