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Open Access Research article

Short-term sick leave and future risk of sickness absence and unemployment - the impact of health status

Hanna Hultin1*, Christina Lindholm2, Mauricio Malfert3 and Jette Möller1

Author affiliations

1 Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden

2 Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden

3 Uppsala Clinical Research Center, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden

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Citation and License

BMC Public Health 2012, 12:861  doi:10.1186/1471-2458-12-861

Published: 10 October 2012

Abstract

Background

In previous studies the authors have found sick leave to be a predictor of future sick leave, unemployment and disability pension. Although sick leave reflects underlying health problems, some studies have suggested that sick leave may have consequences beyond the consequences of the underlying illness. However, few studies have aimed at studying consequences of sick leave while adjusting for ill health. This study aims to explore whether short-term sick leave increases the risk of future long-term sick leave, disability pension, and unemployment. Furthermore, we aim to control for the potentially confounding effects of physical and mental health status.

Methods

Data were gathered from the Stockholm Public Health Cohort (SPHC), restricted to 11,156 employed individuals (48.6% men) aged 18–59, without long-term sick leave, disability pension or in-patient care the year before inclusion (2002). These were followed-up with regard to unemployment, long-term sick leave, and disability pension in 2006 and 2007.

Odds ratios (OR) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated by logistic regression, controlling for six different measures of health status (limiting long-standing illness, self-rated health, mental health, somatic disease, musculoskeletal pain and in-patient care) and socio-demographic factors.

Results

Results from the unadjusted analyses indicated increased risks of long-term sick leave (OR 2.00; CI 1.62-2.46) and short-term unemployment (OR 1.76; CI 1.35-2.29) for individuals exposed to more than one short-term sick-leave spell. There were no increased odds of long-term unemployment (OR 0.54; CI 0.28-1.04) or disability pension (OR 0.72; CI 0.42-1.24). After adjusting for the different measures of health status the odds ratio for short-term unemployment was not statistically significant (OR 1.29; CI 0.97-1.74). The odds ratios for the other outcomes slightly increased after adjustment for the used measures of health status.

Conclusions

The results support the assumption that short-term sick leave may have consequences for future sick leave beyond the effect of ill health. The results point to the importance of paying attention to short-term sick leave in order to prevent subsequent sickness absence.

Keywords:
Short-term sick leave; Health status; Future sickness absence; Unemployment; Population-based study