Table 2

Study characteristics and methodological aspects of studies measuring health-related quality of life of injury patients at one time point (in order of nr of HRQL instruments used - bold author names are studies of children)

Author, year, country

Study population

HRQL instrument

(mode of administration)

Follow up

(response rates)

Predictors for HRQL


Braithwaite, 1998, UK [26]

Severe injuries

ISS > 15

Age 15+

(n = 212)

BDS

(Face to face interview)

5 years (75%)

HRQL associated with body region injured


Korosec, 2006, Slovenia [61]

ICU patients

(n = 98)

EQ5D

(Telephone interview)

2 years (% not available)

No


Aitken, 1999, US and Canada [22]

Hospitalized

Age 7-18

(n = 13649)

FIM

(Filled out by doctors)

Discharge (80%)

Functional outcome associated with type of injury.

Lower extremity fractures caused more limitations at discharge as compared to other injuries


Evans, 2003, UK [27]

Age 11-24

ISS > 15

(n = 125)

OPCS

(Face to face interview)

5 years (87%)

Not measured


Holtslag, 2007, Netherlands [34]

Age 16+

ISS > 15

(n = 359)

SIP

(Self-completed)

Between 12-18 months (93%)

Age, comorbidity, and type of injury were predictors of HRQL


MacKenzie, 2002, US [19]

Admitted > 72 hours or to ICU

Aga 18-59 years

(n = 1587)

SF-36 + cognitive functioning scale

(Face to face interview)

12 months (78%)

Cognitive functioning and head injury were predictors of HRQL


Alves, 2009, Brazil [62]

ED and admitted >24 hours

Age 16-65

GCS > 9 and ISS > 5

(n = 35)

WHOQOL-BREF

(face-to-face interview)

6 months (88%)

Hospitalization, age, and sex were predictors for functional impairment in the physical domain


Airey, 2001, UK [23]

Admitted survivors of major trauma

ISS > 15

(n = 367)

SF-36, OPCS

(Face to face interviews)

5 years (84%)

HRQL associated with injury severity and general health perception


Pirente, 2001, Germany [63]

Admitted and 'severely injured'

(n = 56)

SF-36, TOP

(Telephone interview or self-completed)

12 months (77%)

HRQL among trauma patients higher than control group on al SF-36 dimensions (no injury)


Holtslag, 2008, Netherlands [64]

Age 16+

ISS > 15

(n = 359)

GOS, EQ-5D

(self-completed)

Between 12-18 months (93%)

Injury type and comorbidity were significantly associated with HRQL


Janssens, 2009, Netherlands [38]

Admitted to trauma center

Ag < 16

ISS > 15

(n = 40)

GOS and GOSE, AMA guides

(Self-completed and face-to-face interview)

7 years (70%)

Good discrimination could be made between respondents with different levels of functional impairment


Dimopoulou, 2004, Greece [65]

Admitted multiple trauma patients (n = 117)

GOS, NHP, RDS

(Telephone interview)

12 months (74%)

HRQL associated with injury severity

ISS and severe head trauma were independent predictors of poor HRQL


Keyes, 2001, US [17]

Workers with > 3 days work loss (n = 402)

SF-36, HAQ, QOL

(Telephone interview or self-completed)

2 years (93%)

No


Stalp, 2001, Germany [66]

Admitted

ISS > 15

(n = 150)

SF-12, FIM, GOS, MFA

(Self-completed)

24 months (81%)

HRQL associated with body region injured


Stalp, 2002, Germany [67]

Admitted

ISS > 15

(n = 312)

SF-12, FIM, GOS, MFA

(Self-completed)

24 months (81%)

HRQL associated with body region injured

(highest for lower extremity injury)


AMA-guides = American Medical Association guides; BDS = Bull Disability Scale; CFS = Cognitive Function Scale; CHQ PF-50 = Parent Completed version of the CHQ; CHQ = Child Health Questionnaire; EQ5 D = European Quality of life instrument-5 dimensions;; FIM = Functional Independence Measure; GHQ = General Health Questionnaire; GOS = Glasgow Outcome Scale; HAQ = Health Assessment Questionnaire; HOBQ = Health Outcomes Burn Questionnaire for Children; ICIDH2 = 25 item scale for measuring functional outcome by the International Classification of Impairments Disabilities and Handicaps; MFA = Musculoskeletal Functional Assessment; NHP = Nottingham Health Profile; OPCS = Office of Population Census and Surveys national survey of disability in Great Britain; QOL = Satisfaction with Quality of Life instrument; QWB = Quality of Well Being scale; RDS = Rosser Disease Score; RTW = Return To pre-injury Work status; SF-6D = Medical Outcome Study Short Form-6 dimensions; SF-12 = Medical Outcome Study Short Form-12 items; SF-36 = Medical Outcome Study Short form-36 items; SIP = Sickness Impact Profile; TOP = Trauma Outcome Profile; WeeFIM = Pediatric version of the FIM; WODASII = World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule version II; WHOQOL-BREF = short version of the World Health Organization Quality of life.

Polinder et al. BMC Public Health 2010 10:783   doi:10.1186/1471-2458-10-783

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