Email updates

Keep up to date with the latest news and content from BMC Public Health and BioMed Central.

Open Access Highly Accessed Research article

Exploring cross-sectional associations between common childhood illness, housing and social conditions in remote Australian Aboriginal communities

Ross Bailie1*, Matthew Stevens1, Elizabeth McDonald1, David Brewster2 and Steve Guthridge3

Author Affiliations

1 Menzies School of Health Research, Institute of Advanced Studies, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia

2 School of Medicine, James Cook University, Cairns, Queensland, Australia

3 Health Gains Planning Division, Nth Territory Government Department of Health and Families, Darwin, Nth Territory, Australia

For all author emails, please log on.

BMC Public Health 2010, 10:147  doi:10.1186/1471-2458-10-147

Published: 20 March 2010

Additional files

Additional file 1:

Table 2a Socio-demographic variables unadjusted odds ratios (95% confidence interval) with carer report of child illness in previous two weeks. N = 618 children. Socio-demographic variables and categories are listed and results provided according to illness categories: skin infection - no scabies; scabies w/wo infection; respiratory infection; diarrhoea and vomiting; ear infection.

Format: DOC Size: 58KB Download file

This file can be viewed with: Microsoft Word Viewer

Open Data

Additional file 2:

Table 2b Socio-economic status and financial stress variables and unadjusted odds ratios (95% confidence interval) for carer report of child illness in previous two weeks. N = 618 children. Socio-economic and financial stress variables and categories are listed and results provided according to illness categories: skin infection - no scabies; scabies w/wo infection; respiratory infection; diarrhoea and vomiting; ear infection.

Format: DOC Size: 44KB Download file

This file can be viewed with: Microsoft Word Viewer

Open Data

Additional file 3:

Table 2c Psychosocial variables and unadjusted odds ratios (95% confidence interval) for carer report of child illness in previous two weeks. N = 618 children. Psychosocial variables and categories are listed and results provided according to illness categories: skin infection - no scabies; scabies w/wo infection; respiratory infection; diarrhoea and vomiting; ear infection.

Format: DOC Size: 39KB Download file

This file can be viewed with: Microsoft Word Viewer

Open Data

Additional file 4:

Table 2d Health-related behaviour and hygienic state of environment variables and unadjusted odds ratios (95% confidence interval) for carer report of child illness in previous two weeks. N = 618 children. Health-related behaviour and hygienic state of environment variables and categories are listed and results provided according to illness categories: skin infection - no scabies; scabies w/wo infection; respiratory infection; diarrhoea and vomiting; ear infection.

Format: DOC Size: 81KB Download file

This file can be viewed with: Microsoft Word Viewer

Open Data

Additional file 5:

Table 3 Primary explanatory variables unadjusted odds ratios (95% confidence interval) with carer report of child illness in previous two weeks. N = 618 children. Primary explanatory variables (FHLP measure) are listed and results provided according to illness categories: skin infection - no scabies; scabies w/wo infection; respiratory infection; diarrhoea and vomiting; ear infection.

Format: DOC Size: 64KB Download file

This file can be viewed with: Microsoft Word Viewer

Open Data

Additional file 6:

Table 4 Multivariable adjusted models for carer report of child illness in previous two weeks. Primary explanatory variables and categories (Specific HLP failed) and secondary explanatory variables (socio-demographic characteristics) are listed and results provided according to illness categories: skin infection - no scabies; scabies w/wo infection; respiratory infection; diarrhoea and vomiting; ear infection.

Format: DOC Size: 104KB Download file

This file can be viewed with: Microsoft Word Viewer

Open Data