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Open Access Research article

Visual function and serous retinal detachment in patients with branch retinal vein occlusion and macular edema: a case series

Hidetaka Noma1*, Hideharu Funatsu1, Tatsuya Mimura2 and Katsunori Shimada3

Author Affiliations

1 Department of Ophthalmology, Yachiyo Medical Center, Tokyo Women's Medical University, Chiba, Japan

2 Department of Ophthalmology, University of Tokyo Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan

3 Department of Hygiene and Public Health II, Tokyo Women's Medical University, Tokyo, Japan

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BMC Ophthalmology 2011, 11:29  doi:10.1186/1471-2415-11-29

Published: 26 September 2011

Abstract

Background

The influence of serous retinal detachment (SRD) on retinal sensitivity in patients with branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) and macular edema remains unclear. This is despite the frequent co-existence of SRD and cystoid macular edema (CME) in BRVO patients on optical coherence tomography (OCT) and the fact that CME is the most common form of macular edema secondary to BRVO. We investigated visual function (visual acuity and macular sensitivity), macular thickness, and macular volume in patients with BRVO and macular edema.

Methods

Fifty-three consecutive BRVO patients (26 women and 27 men) were divided into two groups based on optical coherence tomography findings. Macular function was documented by microperimetry, while macular thickness and volume were measured by OCT.

Results

There were 15 patients with SRD and 38 patients with CME. Fourteen of the 15 patients with SRD also had CME. Visual acuity was significantly worse in the SRD group than in the CME group (P = 0.049). Also, macular thickness and macular volume within the central 4°, 10°, and 20° fields were significantly greater in the SRD group (P = 0.008, and P = 0.007, P < 0.001 and P < 0.001, and P < 0.001 and P < 0.001, respectively). However, macular sensitivity within the central 4°, 10°, and 20° fields was not significantly worse in the SRD group than in the CME group.

Conclusions

SRD itself may decrease visual acuity together with CME, because nearly all SRD patients also had CME. SRD does not seem to influence macular function on microperimetry.