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Open Access Highly Accessed Research article

A novel chalcone derivative which acts as a microtubule depolymerising agent and an inhibitor of P-gp and BCRP in in-vitro and in-vivo glioblastoma models

Ahcene Boumendjel1, Anne McLeer-Florin256, Pierre Champelovier25, Diane Allegro4, Dima Muhammad1, Florence Souard1, Madiha Derouazi3, Vincent Peyrot4, Bertrand Toussaint3 and Jean Boutonnat25*

Author Affiliations

1 CNRS, UMR 5063, Bâtiment E, Pôle Chimie, Grenoble, F-38700 France

2 RFMQ, TIMC, IMAG, CNRS, UMR 5525, Bâtiment Jean Roget, Faculté de Médecine, Grenoble, F-38700 France

3 GREPI-THEREX, TIMC, IMAG, CNRS, UMR 5525, Bâtiment Jean Roget, Faculté de Médecine, Grenoble, F-38700 France

4 CRO2, Inserm U911, Aix-Marseille Université, Faculté de Pharmacie de Marseille, 27 bd Jean Moulin, Marseille, F-13005 France

5 CHRU Grenoble, Hôpital Michallon, Département d'Anatomie et Cytologie Pathologiques (DACP), Grenoble, F-38000 France

6 CHRU Grenoble, Hôpital Michallon, Département de Biologie et Pathologie de la Cellule (DBPC), Grenoble, F-38000 France

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BMC Cancer 2009, 9:242  doi:10.1186/1471-2407-9-242

Published: 20 July 2009

Abstract

Background

Over the past decades, in spite of intensive search, no significant increase in the survival of patients with glioblastoma has been obtained. The role of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and especially the activity of efflux pumps belonging to the ATP Binding Cassette (ABC) family may, in part, explain this defect.

Methods

The in-vitro activities of JAI-51 on cell proliferation were assessed by various experimental approaches in four human and a murine glioblastoma cell lines. Using drug exclusion assays and flow-cytometry, potential inhibitory effects of JAI-51 on P-gp and BCRP were evaluated in sensitive or resistant cell lines. JAI-51 activity on in-vitro microtubule polymerization was assessed by tubulin polymerization assay and direct binding measurements by analytical ultracentrifugation. Finally, a model of C57BL/6 mice bearing subcutaneous GL26 glioblastoma xenografts was used to assess the activity of the title compound in vivo. An HPLC method was designed to detect JAI-51 in the brain and other target organs of the treated animals, as well as in the tumours.

Results

In the four human and the murine glioblastoma cell lines tested, 10 μM JAI-51 inhibited proliferation and blocked cells in the M phase of the cell cycle, via its activity as a microtubule depolymerising agent. This ligand binds to tubulin with an association constant of 2 × 105 M-1, overlapping the colchicine binding site. JAI-51 also inhibited the activity of P-gp and BCRP, without being a substrate of these efflux pumps. These in vitro studies were reinforced by our in vivo investigations of C57BL/6 mice bearing GL26 glioblastoma xenografts, in which JAI-51 induced a delay in tumour onset and a tumour growth inhibition, following intraperitoneal administration of 96 mg/kg once a week. In accordance with these results, JAI-51 was detected by HPLC in the tumours of the treated animals. Moreover, JAI-51 was detected in the brain, showing that the molecule is also able to cross the BBB.

Conclusion

These in vitro and in vivo data suggest that JAI-51 could be a good candidate for a new treatment of tumours of the CNS. Further investigations are in progress to associate the title compound chemotherapy to radiotherapy in a rat model.