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Case report: Malignant teratoma of the uterine corpus

Thomas Newsom-Davis1, Daniel Poulter2, Rebecca Gray3, Mohammed Ameen4, Iain Lindsay5, Kyriakos Papanikolaou2, Simon Butler-Manuel2, Timothy Christmas6, Peter Townsend2 and Michael Seckl1*

Author Affiliations

1 Department of Medical Oncology, Imperial College School of Medicine, Charing Cross Hospital, Fulham Palace Road, London, UK

2 Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, East Surrey Hospital, Redhill, Surrey, UK

3 Department of Medicine, East Surrey Hospital, Redhill, Surrey, UK

4 Derpartment of Histopathology, East Surrey Hospital, Redhill, Surrey, UK

5 Department of Histopathology, Imperial College School of Medicine, Charing Cross Hospital, Fulham Palace Road, London, UK

6 Department of Urological Surgery, Imperial College School of Medicine, Charing Cross Hospital, Fulham Palace Road, London, UK

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BMC Cancer 2009, 9:195  doi:10.1186/1471-2407-9-195

Published: 18 June 2009

Abstract

Background

Teratomas are the commonest germ cell tumours and are most frequently found in the testes and ovary. Extragonadal teratomas are rare and mainly occur in midline structures. Uterine teratomas are extremely rare with only a few previous case reports, usually involving mature teratomas of the uterine cervix.

Case Presentation

We report an 82-year-old lady presenting with post-menopausal bleeding. Initial investigations revealed a benign teratoma of the uterus which was removed. Her symptoms persisted and a recurrent, now malignant, teratoma of the uterine corpus was resected at hysterectomy. Six months after surgery she relapsed with para-aortic lymphadenopathy and was treated with a taxane, etoposide and cisplatin-containing chemotherapy regimen followed by retroperitoneal lymph node dissection.

Conclusion

In this report we discuss the aetiology, diagnosis and management of uterine teratomas, and review previous case studies.