Email updates

Keep up to date with the latest news and content from BMC Nephrology and BioMed Central.

Open Access Highly Accessed Research article

Factors associated with chronic musculoskeletal pain in patients with chronic kidney disease

Heng-Jung Hsu123, Chiung-Hui Yen4, Kuang-Hung Hsu5, I-Wen Wu13, Chin-Chan Lee13, Ming-Jui Hung236, Chiao-Yin Sun13, Chia-Chi Chou13, Yung-Chih Chen13, Ming-Fang Hsieh13, Chun-Yu Chen13, Chiao-Ying Hsu13, Chi-Jen Tsai13 and Mai-Szu Wu12378*

Author Affiliations

1 Department of Nephrology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, 222, Mai-Chin Road, Keelung 20401, Taiwan

2 The Graduate Institute of Clinical Medical Sciences, Chang Gung University Medical College, Taoyuan School of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan

3 Chang Gung University, Taipei, Taiwan

4 Department of Pediatrics and Rheumatology, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan

5 Laboratory of Epidemiology, Department of Health Care Management, Chang Gung University, Taipei, Taiwan

6 Department of Cardiology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Keelung, Taiwan

7 Division of Nephrology, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan

8 Department of Internal Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan

For all author emails, please log on.

BMC Nephrology 2014, 15:6  doi:10.1186/1471-2369-15-6

Published: 8 January 2014

Abstract

Background

Chronic musculoskeletal (MS) pain is common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) undergoing haemodialysis. However, epidemiological data for chronic MS pain and factors associated with chronic MS pain in patients with early- or late-stage CKD who are not undergoing dialysis are limited.

Method

A cross-sectional study to evaluate the prevalence of chronic MS pain and factors associated with chronic MS pain in patients with early- and late-stage CKD who were not undergoing dialysis, was conducted. In addition, the distribution of pain severity among patients with different stages of CKD was evaluated.

Results

Of the 456 CKD patients studied, 53.3% (n = 243/456) had chronic MS pain. Chronic MS pain was independently and significantly associated with hyperuricemia as co-morbidity, as well as with the calcium × phosphate product levels. In CKD patients with hyperuricemia, chronic MS pain showed a negative, independent significant association with diabetes mellitus as a co-morbidity (odds ratio: 0.413, p = 0.020). However, in the CKD patients without hyperuricemia as a co-morbidity, chronic MS pain showed an independent significant association with the calcium × phosphate product levels (odds ratio: 1.093, p = 0.027). Furthermore, stage-5 CKD patients seemed to experience more severe chronic MS pain than patients with other stages of CKD.

Conclusion

Chronic MS pain is common in CKD patients. Chronic MS pain was independently and significantly associated with hyperuricemia as co-morbidity, and with the calcium × phosphate product levels in early- and late-stage CKD patients who were not on dialysis.

Keywords:
Chronic pain; Musculoskeletal pain; Chronic kidney disease; Hyperuricemia