Open Access Highly Accessed Research article

Is hyperuricemia an independent risk factor for new-onset chronic kidney disease?: a systematic review and meta-analysis based on observational cohort studies

Ling Li1, Chen Yang2, Yuliang Zhao1, Xiaoxi Zeng1, Fang Liu1 and Ping Fu1*

Author Affiliations

1 Division of Nephrology, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, Sichuan, China

2 Division of General Surgery, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, Sichuan, China

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BMC Nephrology 2014, 15:122  doi:10.1186/1471-2369-15-122

Published: 27 July 2014

Abstract

Background

Hyperuricemia has been reported to be associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD). However whether an elevated serum uric acid level is an independent risk factor for new-onset CKD remained controversial.

Methods

A systematic review and meta-analysis using a literature search of online databases including PubMed, Embase, Ovid and ISI Web/Web of Science was conducted. Summary adjusted odds ratios with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated to evaluate the risk estimates of hyperuricemia for new-onset CKD.

Results

Thirteen studies containing 190,718 participants were included. A significant positive association was found between elevated serum uric acid levels and new-onset CKD at follow-up (summary OR, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.05–1.25). Hyperuricemia was found be an independent predictor for the development of newly diagnosed CKD in non-CKD patients (summary OR, 2.35; 95% CI, 1.59–3.46). This association increased with increasing length of follow-up. No significant differences were found for risk estimates of the associations between elevated serum uric acid levels and developing CKD between males and females.

Conclusions

With long-term follow-up of non-CKD individuals, elevated serum uric acid levels showed an increased risk for the development of chronic renal dysfunction.

Keywords:
Chronic kidney disease; Hyperuricemia; Uric acid