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Open Access Highly Accessed Research article

High prevalence of Arginine to Glutamine Substitution at 98, 141 and 162 positions in Troponin I (TNNI3) associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy among Indians

Deepa Selvi Rani12, Pratibha Nallari2, Singh Priyamvada1, Calambur Narasimhan3, Lalji Singh145 and Kumarasamy Thangaraj1*

Author Affiliations

1 Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology, CSIR, Uppal Road, Hyderabad, 500 007, India

2 Department of Genetics, Osmania University, Hyderabad, India

3 Department of Cardiology, CARE Hospitals, Hyderabad, India

4 Genome Foundation, Hyderabad, India

5 Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, India

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BMC Medical Genetics 2012, 13:69  doi:10.1186/1471-2350-13-69

Published: 10 August 2012

Abstract

Background

Troponin I (TNNI3) is the inhibitory subunit of the thin filament regulatory complex Troponin, which confers calcium-sensitivity to striated muscle actomyosin ATPase activity. Mutations (2-7%) in this gene had been reported in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patients (HCM). However, the frequencies of mutations and associated clinical presentation have not been established in cardiomyopathy patients of Indian origin, hence we have undertaken this study.

Methods

We have sequenced all the exons, including the exon-intron boundaries of TNNI3 gene in 101 hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patients (HCM), along with 160 healthy controls, inhabited in the same geographical region of southern India.

Results

Our study revealed a total of 16 mutations. Interestingly, we have observed Arginine to Glutamine (R to Q) mutation at 3 positions 98, 141 and 162, exclusively in HCM patients with family history of sudden cardiac death. The novel R98Q was observed in a severe hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy patient (HOCM). The R141Q mutation was observed in two familial cases of severe asymmetric septal hypertrophy (ASH++). The R162Q mutation was observed in a ASH++ patient with mean septal thickness of 29 mm, and have also consists of allelic heterogeneity by means of having one more synonymous (E179E) mutation at g.4797: G → A: in the same exon 7, which replaces a very frequent codon (GAG: 85%) with a rare codon (GAA: 14%). Screening for R162Q mutation in all the available family members revealed its presence in 9 individuals, including 7 with allelic heterogeneity (R162Q and E179E) of which 4 were severely affected. We also found 2 novel SNPs, (g.2653; G → A and g.4003 C → T) exclusively in HCM, and in silico analysis of these SNPs have predicted to cause defect in recognition/binding sites for proteins responsible for proper splicing.

Conclusion

Our study has provided valuable information regarding the prevalence of TNNI3 mutations in Indian HCM patients and its risk assessment, these will help in genetic counseling and to adopt appropriate treatment strategies.

Keywords:
TNNI3-Troponin I; Cardiomyopathy; SNPs; HCM; Indians; Mutations