Email updates

Keep up to date with the latest news and content from BMC Medical Genetics and BioMed Central.

Open Access Highly Accessed Case report

Microdeletion del(22)(q12.2) encompassing the facial development-associated gene, MN1 (meningioma 1) in a child with Pierre-Robin sequence (including cleft palate) and neurofibromatosis 2 (NF2): a case report and review of the literature

Tom B Davidson16, Pedro A Sanchez-Lara145*, Linda M Randolph15, Mark D Krieger25, Shi-Qi Wu145, Ashok Panigrahy35, Hiroyuki Shimada45 and Anat Erdreich-Epstein145*

Author Affiliations

1 Department of Pediatrics and the Saban Research Institute at Children's Hospital Los Angeles, 4650 Sunset Boulevard, Los Angeles, California 90027-6062, USA

2 Department of Surgery and the Saban Research Institute at Children's Hospital Los Angeles, 4650 Sunset Boulevard, Los Angeles, California 90027-6062, USA

3 Department of Radiology and the Saban Research Institute at Children's Hospital Los Angeles, 4650 Sunset Boulevard, Los Angeles, California 90027-6062, USA

4 Department of Pathology and the Saban Research Institute at Children's Hospital Los Angeles, 4650 Sunset Boulevard, Los Angeles, California 90027-6062, USA

5 The Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, 1975 Zonal Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90089-9034, USA

6 Division of Hematology/Oncology, Mattel Children's Hospital, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1752, USA

For all author emails, please log on.

BMC Medical Genetics 2012, 13:19  doi:10.1186/1471-2350-13-19

Published: 22 March 2012

Abstract

Background

Pierre-Robin sequence (PRS) is defined by micro- and/or retrognathia, glossoptosis and cleft soft palate, either caused by deformational defect or part of a malformation syndrome. Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) is an autosomal dominant syndrome caused by mutations in the NF2 gene on chromosome 22q12.2. NF2 is characterized by bilateral vestibular schwannomas, spinal cord schwannomas, meningiomas and ependymomas, and juvenile cataracts. To date, NF2 and PRS have not been described together in the same patient.

Case presentation

We report a female with PRS (micrognathia, cleft palate), microcephaly, ocular hypertelorism, mental retardation and bilateral hearing loss, who at age 15 was also diagnosed with severe NF2 (bilateral cerebellopontine schwannomas and multiple extramedullary/intradural spine tumors). This is the first published report of an individual with both diagnosed PRS and NF2. High resolution karyotype revealed 46, XX, del(22)(q12.1q12.3), FISH confirmed a deletion encompassing NF2, and chromosomal microarray identified a 3,693 kb deletion encompassing multiple genes including NF2 and MN1 (meningioma 1).

Five additional patients with craniofacial dysmorphism and deletion in chromosome 22-adjacent-to or containing NF2 were identified in PubMed and the DECIPHER clinical chromosomal database. Their shared chromosomal deletion encompassed MN1, PITPNB and TTC28. MN1, initially cloned from a patient with meningioma, is an oncogene in murine hematopoiesis and participates as a fusion gene (TEL/MN1) in human myeloid leukemias. Interestingly, Mn1-haploinsufficient mice have abnormal skull development and secondary cleft palate. Additionally, Mn1 regulates maturation and function of calvarial osteoblasts and is an upstream regulator of Tbx22, a gene associated with murine and human cleft palate. This suggests that deletion of MN1 in the six patients we describe may be causally linked to their cleft palates and/or craniofacial abnormalities.

Conclusions

Thus, our report describes a NF2-adjacent chromosome 22q12.2 deletion syndrome and is the first to report association of MN1 deletion with abnormal craniofacial development and/or cleft palate in humans.

Keywords:
Chromosome 22q12.2; Cleft palate; MN1; NF2; Pierre-Robin sequence