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Open Access Research article

The association of RANTES polymorphism with severe acute respiratory syndrome in Hong Kong and Beijing Chinese

Man Wai Ng1, Gangqiao Zhou2, Wai Po Chong1, Loretta Wing Yan Lee1, Helen Ka Wai Law1, Hongxing Zhang2, Wilfred Hing Sang Wong1, Susanna Fung Shan Fok1, Yun Zhai2, Raymond WH Yung3, Eudora Y Chow4, Ka Leung Au5, Eric YT Chan6, Wilina Lim7, JS Malik Peiris8, Fuchu He2 and Yu Lung Lau1*

Author Affiliations

1 Department of Paediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, The Hong Kong Jockey Club Research Centre, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR, China

2 The State Key Laboratory of Proteomics, Beijing Proteome Research Center, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing, China

3 Department of Pathology, Pamela Nethersole Youde Hospital, Hong Kong SAR, China

4 Department of Pathology, United Christian Hospital, Hong Kong SAR, China

5 Princess Margaret Hospital, Hong Kong SAR, China

6 Queen Mary Hospital, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China

7 Government Virus Unit, Department of Health, Hong Kong SAR, China

8 Department of Microbiology, The Hong Kong Jockey Club Research Centre, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, Pokfulam, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China

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BMC Infectious Diseases 2007, 7:50  doi:10.1186/1471-2334-7-50

Published: 1 June 2007

Abstract

Background

Chemokines play important roles in inflammation and antiviral action. We examined whether polymorphisms of RANTES, IP-10 and Mig affect the susceptibility to and outcome of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS).

Methods

We tested the polymorphisms of RANTES, IP-10 and Mig for their associations with SARS in 495 Hong Kong Chinese SARS patients and 578 controls. Then we tried to confirm the results in 356 Beijing Chinese SARS patients and 367 controls.

Results

RANTES -28 G allele was associated with SARS susceptibility in Hong Kong Chinese (P < 0.0001, OR = 2.80, 95%CI:2.11–3.71). Individuals with RANTES -28 CG and GG genotypes had a 3.28-fold (95%CI:2.32–4.64) and 3.06-fold (95%CI:1.47–6.39) increased risk of developing SARS respectively (P < 0.0001). This -28 G allele conferred risk of death in a gene-dosage dependent manner (P = 0.014) with CG and GG individuals having a 2.12-fold (95% CI: 1.11–4.06) and 4.01-fold (95% CI: 1.30–12.4) increased risk. For the replication of RANTES data in Beijing Chinese, the -28 G allele was not associated with susceptibility to SARS. However, -28 CG (OR = 4.27, 95%CI:1.64–11.1) and GG (OR = 3.34, 95%CI:0.37–30.7) were associated with admission to intensive care units or death due to SARS (P = 0.011).

Conclusion

RANTES -28 G allele plays a role in the pathogenesis of SARS.