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Open Access Research article

Population based study of genital Chlamydia trachomatis prevalence and associated factors in Norway: A cross sectional study

Hilde Kløvstad1*, Andrej Grjibovski2 and Preben Aavitsland34

Author Affiliations

1 Norwegian Institute of Public Health, PO box 4404, Nydalen, Oslo, 0403, Norway

2 Norwegian Institute of Public Health, PO box 4404, Nydalen, Oslo, 0403, Norway

3 Norwegian Institute of Public Health, PO box 4404, Nydalen, Oslo, 0403, Norway

4 Current address: Epidemi, Aerfuglveien 53, Kristiansand, 4623, Norway

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BMC Infectious Diseases 2012, 12:150  doi:10.1186/1471-2334-12-150

Published: 2 July 2012

Abstract

Background

The number of diagnosed cases of Chlamydia trachomatis infection has been increasing in the past years in Norway although the testing rate has been relatively stable. The aim of this study was to measure the prevalence of genital Chlamydia trachomatis in young men and women in one county in Norway and determine associated factors in order to better target preventive measures.

Methods

We mailed to a random sample of 10 000 persons aged 18–25 in Rogaland county a mail-back urine sample kit and a self-administered questionnaire with questions on socio-demographic details, health seeking behaviour and symptoms of and history of sexually transmitted diseases. Associations between current Clamydia trachomatis infection and the above mentioned factors were studied by multiple logistic regression.

Results

The response rate among women was 18.9% (930/4923) and 11.9% (605/5077) among men. The prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis infection was 5.8% (95% CI 4.5-6.8) among women and 5.1% (95% CI 3.8-6.8) among men. For men a greater number of partners during the last year (p for trend < 0.001), and living in a municipality without a local youth clinic increased the odds of infection (OR 8.6, 95% CI 2.2-33.9). For women a greater number of partners during the last year (p < 0.001) and not having consulted a family doctor for STIs (OR 2.1 95% CI 1.1-4.2) were positively associated with infection while not having a previous Chlamydia trachomatis diagnosis decreased the odds of having this infection (OR 0.3, 95% CI 0.2-0.7).

Conclusion

Our results indicate the importance of having a visible youth clinic in each municipality. It also suggests targeting women who have had a previous Chlamydia trachomatis infection diagnosed before.