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Open Access Highly Accessed Research article

Effect of heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccination on invasive pneumococcal disease in preterm born infants

Simon Rückinger1*, Mark van der Linden2 and Rüdiger von Kries1

Author Affiliations

1 Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Institute of Social Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Division of Epidemiology, Germany

2 National Reference Center for Streptococci, Institute of Medical Microbiology, University Hospital RWTH Aachen, Germany

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BMC Infectious Diseases 2010, 10:12  doi:10.1186/1471-2334-10-12

Published: 19 January 2010

Abstract

Background

Evidence for protection of preterm born infants from invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) by 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccination (PCV7) is relatively sparse. Data from randomized trials is based on relatively small numbers of preterm born children.

Methods

We report data from active prospective surveillance of IPD in children in Germany. The cohorts of preterm born children in 2000 and 2007 and the respective whole birth cohorts are compared regarding occurrence of IPD.

Results

After introduction of PCV7 we observed a reduction in the rate of IPD in preterm born infants comparing the 2000 and 2007 birth cohort. The rate of IPD among the whole birth cohorts was reduced from 15.0 to 8.5 notifications per 100,000 (P < .001). The impact among the preterm birth cohort was comparable: A reduction in notification rate from 26.1 to 16.7 per 100,000 comparing the 2000 with the 2007 preterm birth cohort (P = .39). Preterm born infants with IPD were either unvaccinated or vaccinated delayed or incomplete.

Conclusions

This adds to evidence that PCV7 also protects preterm born infants effectively from IPD. Preterm born infants should receive pneumococcal vaccination according to their chronological age.