Table 2

Summary of responses to Likert scales

Agree

Neither agree nor disagree

Disagree

Don't know


There is little support that general practice can offer to carers (n = 75)

7(9%)

9 (12%)

58(77%)

1 (1%)


I feel confident that I could identify the carers in my practice (n = 74)

33 (45%)

17 (23%)

21 (28%)

3 (4%)


In general I feel confident that I meet the needs of carers (n = 75)

8 (11%)

27 (36%)

36 (47%)

4(5%)


Supporting carers can be difficult (n = 74)

64 (86%)

4 (5%)

5 (7%)

1 (1%)


If the cared-for person dies, I routinely contact their carer (n = 74)

40(54%)

10 (14%)

17 (23%)

7(9%)


I take an active role in supporting carers (n = 74)

39(53%)

21 (28%)

9 (12%)

5 (7%)


There is little point in referring carers to support services as they are unlikely to use them (n = 75)

1 (1%)

11 (15%)

63 (84%)

0 (0%)


GPs should be pro-active in identifying carers (n = 75)

70 (93%)

3 (4%)

1 (1%)

1(1%)


Carers should be a partner in the health care of their cared-for person (n = 75)

63 (84%)

9(12%)

1 (1%)

2 (3%)


Confidentiality of the cared-for person can be an issue when working with carers (n = 75)

69 (92%)

3 (4%)

3 (4%)

0 (0%)


Carers are often a barrier in managing the healthcare of the cared-for person (n = 75)

7 (9%)

24 (32%)

43 (57%)

1 (1%)


Carers deserve more support from primary care teams (n = 74)

63 (85%)

10 (14%)

1 (1%)

0(0%)


Carers are no more likely to suffer from emotional problems than the public in general (n = 75)

17(23%)

2 (3%)

56 (75%)

0 (0%)


Young carers are more likely to self-harm than other young people (n = 75)

48(64%)

8 (11%)

1 (1%)

18 (24%)


The all-cause mortality rate is increased for carers (n = 75)

48(64%)

10 (13%)

1 (1%)

16 (21%)


Carers frequently have to stop paid employment once they become carers (n = 75)

60 (80%)

8 (11%)

1(1%)

6 (8%)


General practitioners are not trained sufficiently well to support carers (n = 75)

67 (89%)

5 (7%)

3 (4%)

0 (0%)


Carers from some minority ethnic groups are less likely to accept support from primary care (n = 75)

75 (61%)

19 (15%)

5 (4%)

20 (16%)


There are sufficient support services for carers (n = 75)

2 (3%)

7 (9%)

59 (79%)

7 (9%)


Greenwood et al. BMC Family Practice 2010 11:100   doi:10.1186/1471-2296-11-100

Open Data