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Open Access Research article

Vascular disease in women: comparison of diagnoses in hospital episode statistics and general practice records in England

F Lucy Wright*, Jane Green, Dexter Canoy, Benjamin J Cairns, Angela Balkwill, Valerie Beral and for the Million Women Study Collaborators

Author Affiliations

Cancer Epidemiology Unit, University of Oxford, Richard Doll Building, Old Road Campus, Headington, Oxford, OX3 7LF, UK

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BMC Medical Research Methodology 2012, 12:161  doi:10.1186/1471-2288-12-161

Published: 23 October 2012

Abstract

Background

Electronic linkage to routine administrative datasets, such as the Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) in England, is increasingly used in medical research. Relatively little is known about the reliability of HES diagnostic information for epidemiological studies. In the United Kingdom (UK), general practitioners hold comprehensive records for individuals relating to their primary, secondary and tertiary care. For a random sample of participants in a large UK cohort, we compared vascular disease diagnoses in HES and general practice records to assess agreement between the two sources.

Methods

Million Women Study participants with a HES record of hospital admission with vascular disease (ischaemic heart disease [ICD-10 codes I20-I25], cerebrovascular disease [G45, I60-I69] or venous thromboembolism [I26, I80-I82]) between April 1st 1997 and March 31st 2005 were identified. In each broad diagnostic group and in women with no such HES diagnoses, a random sample of about a thousand women was selected for study. We asked each woman’s general practitioner to provide information on her history of vascular disease and this information was compared with the HES diagnosis record.

Results

Over 90% of study forms sent to general practitioners were returned and 88% of these contained analysable data. For the vast majority of study participants for whom information was available, diagnostic information from general practice and HES records was consistent. Overall, for 93% of women with a HES diagnosis of vascular disease, general practice records agreed with the HES diagnosis; and for 97% of women with no HES diagnosis of vascular disease, the general practitioner had no record of a diagnosis of vascular disease. For severe vascular disease, including myocardial infarction (I21-22), stroke, both overall (I60-64) and by subtype, and pulmonary embolism (I26), HES records appeared to be both reliable and complete.

Conclusion

Hospital admission data in England provide diagnostic information for vascular disease of sufficient reliability for epidemiological analyses.

Keywords:
Hospital episode statistics; Hospital records; Medical records; Comparison; Diagnosis; Validation; Cohort study; Vascular disease; Myocardial infarction; Stroke; Pulmonary embolism; Venous thromboembolism; Ischaemic heart disease