Figure 4.

Neuronal markers in the cerebral cortex, striatum/mesencephalon, hippocampus, and cerebellum. (A, E) Densitometry analysis of immunoblots prepared from lysates of cerebral cortex of WT (white bars) and Ctsk-/- mice (grey bars) as indicated. Synaptotagmin levels were significantly elevated by approximately 45% in Ctsk-/- mice as compared to WT (A, Ctsk-/- n = 10; WT n = 13), while analysis of the same samples showed no significant difference in the amount of NF-M protein (E, Ctsk-/- n = 8; WT n = 6). (B, F) Densitometry analysis of immunoblots prepared from lysates of striatum/mesencephalon of WT (white bars) and Ctsk-/- mice (grey bars) as indicated. Synaptotagmin levels were elevated in Ctsk-/- mice by 95% as compared to WT mice (B, Ctsk-/- n = 10; WT n = 10), while no significant difference was observed in NF-M protein (F, Ctsk-/- n = 9; WT n = 11). (C, G) Densitometry analysis of immunoblots prepared from lysates of cerebellum of WT (white bars) and Ctsk-/- mice (grey bars) as indicated. Synaptotagmin levels were significantly down-regulated in Ctsk-/- mice by approximately 55% compared to WT animals (C, Ctsk-/- n = 10; WT n = 13), while no significant difference was observed in NF-M protein between the two genotypes (G, Ctsk-/- n = 9; WT n = 10). (D, H) Densitometry analysis of immunoblots prepared from lysates of hippocampus of WT (white bars) and Ctsk-/- mice (grey bars) as indicated. No significant difference was detected in the amount of synaptotagmin in Ctsk-/- mice compared to WT (D, Ctsk-/- n = 10; WT n = 13), while NF-M protein was elevated by approximately 50% in Ctsk-/- mice compared to WT (H, Ctsk-/- n = 11; WT n = 9). Protein levels were determined by densitometry and grey values per area were normalized to the loading control β-tubulin. Bar charts denote mean values expressed as percent of control ± standard error; levels of significance are denoted as * for p < 0.05; ** for p < 0.01; *** for p < 0.001. Representative immunoblots are shown in the lower panels; lanes represent separate individuals.

Dauth et al. BMC Neuroscience 2011 12:74   doi:10.1186/1471-2202-12-74
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