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Open Access Research article

The transforming acidic coiled coil (TACC1) protein modulates the transcriptional activity of the nuclear receptors TR and RAR

Romain Guyot1, Séverine Vincent1, Julie Bertin1, Jacques Samarut12 and Patrick Ravel-Chapuis1*

Author Affiliations

1 Institut de Génomique Fonctionnelle de Lyon (IGFL), Universitéde Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS, INRA, Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, 46 allée d'Italie, 69364 Lyon Cedex 07, France

2 Hospices Civils de Lyon, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, 69495 Pierre-Bénite cedex, France

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BMC Molecular Biology 2010, 11:3  doi:10.1186/1471-2199-11-3

Published: 15 January 2010

Abstract

Background

The transcriptional activity of Nuclear hormone Receptors (NRs) is regulated by interaction with coactivator or corepressor proteins. Many of these cofactors have been shown to have a misregulated expression or to show a subcellular mislocalization in cancer cell lines or primary tumors. Therefore they can be factors involved in the process of oncogenesis.

Results

We describe a novel NR coregulator, TACC1, which belongs to the Transforming Acidic Coiled Coil (TACC) family. The interaction of TACC1 with Thyroid Hormone Receptors (TR) and several other NRs has been shown in a yeast two-hybrid screen and confirmed by GST pulldown, colocalization and co-immunoprecipitation experiments. TACC1 interacts preferentially with unliganded NRs. In F9 cells, endogenous TACC1 localized in the chromatin-enriched fraction of the nucleus and interacted with Retinoid Acid Receptors (RARα) in the nucleus. TACC1 depletion in the cell led to decreased RARα and TRα ligand-dependent transcriptional activity and to delocalization of TR from the nucleus to the cytoplasm.

Conclusions

From these experimental studies we propose that TACC1 might be a scaffold protein building up a transcriptional complex around the NRs we studied. This function of TACC1 might account for its involvement in several forms of tumour development.