Open Access Highly Accessed Methodology article

Molecular probe technology detects bacteria without culture

Richard W Hyman137*, Robert P St Onge13, Hyunsung Kim4, John S Tamaresis5, Molly Miranda3, Ana Maria Aparicio3, Marilyn Fukushima13, Nader Pourmand4, Linda C Giudice6 and Ronald W Davis123

Author Affiliations

1 Departments of Biochemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA

2 Departments of Biochemistry and Genetics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA

3 Stanford Genome Technology Center, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA

4 Biomolecular Engineering Department, Jack Baskin School of Engineering, University of California, Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA, USA

5 Laboratory of Endometrial Biology, Functional Genomics, and Stem Cell Research, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA

6 Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA

7 Stanford Genome Technology Center, 855 S. California St., Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA

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BMC Microbiology 2012, 12:29  doi:10.1186/1471-2180-12-29

Published: 9 March 2012

Additional files

Additional file 1:

Table S1. Amplification primers for subsequent SOLiD sequencing. Table S2. Clinical samples: comparison of BigDye-terminator reads, Tag4 fluorescent signals, and SOLiD reads. The BigDye-terminator data are from [5]. Table S3. Bacteria and the RefSeq numbers for their genome sequences. Figure S1. Quantitative data for the SOLiD assay for simulated clinical sample A (SCA). Figure S2. Quantitative data for the SOLiD assay for simulated clinical sample C (SCC). Figure S3. Quantitative data for the SOLiD assay for simulated clinical sample D (SCD). Figure S4. Quantitative data for the SOLiD assay for simulated clinical sample E (SCE).

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