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Open Access Research article

The 10 sea urchin receptor for egg jelly proteins (SpREJ) are members of the polycystic kidney disease-1 (PKD1) family

H Jayantha Gunaratne13, Gary W Moy1, Masashi Kinukawa1, Shinji Miyata1, Silvia A Mah2 and Victor D Vacquier1*

Author Affiliations

1 Center for Marine Biotechnology and Biomedicine, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0202, USA

2 Jacobs School of Engineering, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0403, USA

3 Experimental Therapeutic Center, Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, 61 Biopolis Drive, Proteos, 138673, Singapore

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BMC Genomics 2007, 8:235  doi:10.1186/1471-2164-8-235

Published: 13 July 2007

Abstract

Background

Mutations in the human polycystic kidney disease-1 (hPKD1) gene result in ~85% of cases of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, the most frequent human monogenic disease. PKD1 proteins are large multidomain proteins involved in a variety of signal transduction mechanisms. Obtaining more information about members of the PKD1 family will help to clarify their functions. Humans have five hPKD1 proteins, whereas sea urchins have 10. The PKD1 proteins of the sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, are referred to as the Receptor for Egg Jelly, or SpREJ proteins. The SpREJ proteins form a subfamily within the PKD1 family. They frequently contain C-type lectin domains, PKD repeats, a REJ domain, a GPS domain, a PLAT/LH2 domain, 1–11 transmembrane segments and a C-terminal coiled-coil domain.

Results

The 10 full-length SpREJ cDNA sequences were determined. The secondary structures of their deduced proteins were predicted and compared to the five human hPKD1 proteins. The genomic structures of the 10 SpREJs show low similarity to each other. All 10 SpREJs are transcribed in either embryos or adult tissues. SpREJs show distinct patterns of expression during embryogenesis. Adult tissues show tissue-specific patterns of SpREJ expression.

Conclusion

Possession of a REJ domain of about 600 residues defines this family. Except for SpREJ1 and 3, that are thought to be associated with the sperm acrosome reaction, the functions of the other SpREJ proteins remain unknown. The sea urchin genome is one-fourth the size of the human genome, but sea urchins have 10 SpREJ proteins, whereas humans have five. Determination of the tissue specific function of each of these proteins will be of interest to those studying echinoderm development. Sea urchins are basal deuterostomes, the line of evolution leading to the vertebrates. The study of individual PKD1 proteins will increase our knowledge of the importance of this gene family.