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Open Access Research article

Transcriptome analysis reveals unique metabolic features in the Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts associated with environmental survival and stresses

Haili Zhang1, Fengguang Guo1, Huaijun Zhou4* and Guan Zhu123*

Author Affiliations

1 Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas, 77843, USA

2 Faculty of Genetics Program, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas, 77843, USA

3 Institute of Genetics, College of Life Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310058, China

4 Department of Animal Science, University of California, Davis, CA, 95616, USA

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BMC Genomics 2012, 13:647  doi:10.1186/1471-2164-13-647

Published: 21 November 2012

Additional files

Additional file 1:

Figure S1. Morphology of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts before (A) and after (B) equilibrated to room temperature overnight (RT O/N). Oocyts were stored at 4 °C prior to equilibration at room temperature overnight before UV-irradiation and RNA extraction to minimize the effect of temperature variations on gene expressions.

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Additional file 2:

Table S1. Complete list of Groups I and II genes classified under major functional categories. Their expression levels are indicated by quartiles, i.e., L0 = lowly or unexpressed Group II genes, L1 to L4 = Group I genes with expression levels in the parasite oocysts at bottom to top quartiles. Genes with expression at L0 and L4 levels are highlighted by green and pink colors for easy identification.

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Additional file 3:

Figure S2. Comparison of data derived from Mauzy et al. (2012) and this study by qRT-PCR on the relative levels of Cryptosporidium parvum LDH, ADH and AceCL genes in the intracellular developmental stages. Data from Mauzy et al. (2012) were extracted from the CryptoDB databases ( http://www.CryptoDB.org webcite).

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Additional file 4:

Table S2. A) Functional clarification of the top 100 genes in Toxoplasma gondii with the highest levels of expression in the oocysts sporulated for 10 days; B) List of the top 100 highly expressed genes in the Toxoplasma gondii oocysts sporulated for 10 days. Original data were generated by Fritz et al. (2012) and extracted from http://www.ToxoDB.org. webcite

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Additional file 5:

Figure S3. Relative levels of the two Toxoplasma gondii LDH genes in oocysts, tachyzoites and bradyzoites. Data used in this analysis were extracted from the ToxoDB databases ( http://www.ToxoDB.org webcite).

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Additional file 6:

Table S3. Complete list of significantly regulated genes in the oocysts upon UV-irradiation and recovered for 0.5 h and 5 h. Genes are grouped into 9 clusters based their expression patterns.

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Additional file 7:

Figure S4. Distribution of regulated genes into 9 clusters based on the expression dynamics in the UV-irradiated oocysts after 0.5 h and 5 h of recovery times. Fold changes in gene expression are shown as ratios of normalized median signals between treated and control groups (T/C).

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Additional file 8:

Table S4. List of primers used in this study.

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