Figure 3.

Impact of stochastic phenotypic switching and asymmetric generation times on the persistence of phenotype oscillations. (A1–A4): Persistence and amplitude of cycles for different stochastic switching values. Subsequent panels show the results for increased values of μ, illustrating that high levels of stochastic switching can also destroy the persistence of the cyclic phenotype frequency dynamics. (B1-B4): Persistence and amplitude of cycles for different asymmetric generation times between species X and Y . Subsequent panels show the results for increased values of g (number of Y generations per X generation). Rapid adaptation of one species also destroys cyclic dynamics, although the impact on cycles at high values of induces switching (especially αX) is much less prominent. The following parameter values were used: (A1-A4) sX = sY = 0.66, (B1-B4) sX = sY = 0.75; (A1) μ = 10−8, (A2) μ = 2×10−2, (A3) μ = 3×10−2, (A4) μ = 4×10−2; (B1) g = 1, (B2) g = 2, (B3) g = 3, (B4) g = 10; all panels were produced in resolution 51×51, and cycles of amplitude 0.5×10−2where considered non-existent.

Mostowy et al. BMC Evolutionary Biology 2012 12:93   doi:10.1186/1471-2148-12-93
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