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Open Access Highly Accessed Methodology article

A boosting method for maximizing the partial area under the ROC curve

Osamu Komori1* and Shinto Eguchi12

Author Affiliations

1 Prediction and Knowledge Discovery Research Center, The Institute of Statistical Mathematics, Midori-cho, Tachikawa, Tokyo 190-8562, Japan

2 The Institute of Statistical Mathematics and Department of Statistical Science, The Graduate University for Advanced Studies Midori-cho, Tachikawa, Tokyo 190-8562, Japan

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BMC Bioinformatics 2010, 11:314  doi:10.1186/1471-2105-11-314

Published: 10 June 2010

Abstract

Background

The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve is a fundamental tool to assess the discriminant performance for not only a single marker but also a score function combining multiple markers. The area under the ROC curve (AUC) for a score function measures the intrinsic ability for the score function to discriminate between the controls and cases. Recently, the partial AUC (pAUC) has been paid more attention than the AUC, because a suitable range of the false positive rate can be focused according to various clinical situations. However, existing pAUC-based methods only handle a few markers and do not take nonlinear combination of markers into consideration.

Results

We have developed a new statistical method that focuses on the pAUC based on a boosting technique. The markers are combined componentially for maximizing the pAUC in the boosting algorithm using natural cubic splines or decision stumps (single-level decision trees), according to the values of markers (continuous or discrete). We show that the resulting score plots are useful for understanding how each marker is associated with the outcome variable. We compare the performance of the proposed boosting method with those of other existing methods, and demonstrate the utility using real data sets. As a result, we have much better discrimination performances in the sense of the pAUC in both simulation studies and real data analysis.

Conclusions

The proposed method addresses how to combine the markers after a pAUC-based filtering procedure in high dimensional setting. Hence, it provides a consistent way of analyzing data based on the pAUC from maker selection to marker combination for discrimination problems. The method can capture not only linear but also nonlinear association between the outcome variable and the markers, about which the nonlinearity is known to be necessary in general for the maximization of the pAUC. The method also puts importance on the accuracy of classification performance as well as interpretability of the association, by offering simple and smooth resultant score plots for each marker.